Bob

Jun 102012
 

My father's (Robert Neal Mottice) childhood recollections describe being born in a "little farm house near North Industry" in 1916.  Several years later he speaks of the family moving to Waynesburg:

"The Mottice family moved to Waynesburg in 1920, and lived in what is now known as Frank Miller property on S. Main Street.  The home at the time was owned by my Grandmother and Grandfather Dieringer."

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 Posted by at 8:14 pm
Apr 082012
 

The following undated (though probably from the 1940-50s) "Genealogical and Historical Sketch" was compiled by "The Media Research Bureau, 1110 F Street, Washington, D.C."

The name of Elliot or Elliott is said to have been derived from the dimlnutive of the baptismal name Elias. It is found in ancient records in the various forms of Elyot, Eliot, Ellyott, Elyotte, Eli-ott, Ellyet, Elyett, Elliot, and, Elliott, of which the last two forms are those most generally accepted in America today. The name of Ellott or Ellett has also become Ellio(t)t but it was originally derived from the name of Ellen. 

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Apr 052012
 

A recurring theme in informal Mottice family histories is that the father of Peter Mottice — whoever he was — was killed at the Delaware crossing before the Battle of Trenton during the Revolutionary War.  This story is — so far — unverified.  It would be helpful, of course, if we actually knew who Peter's father was, whether James Thomas Mottice or someone else.

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Apr 012012
 

Establishing a biography for the Elliott family patriarch, Henry Elliott, has been difficult so far.  There is, however, one certain historical document that we can build upon.  This is an 1828 authorization of land transfer of Henry's military lands recorded in the Court House in Harrison County, WV (or what would have been northwestern VA at the time).

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Mar 302012
 

The known patriarch of Bernard Elliott's line, Henry Elliott, has many questions surrounding him.  Although I show him as being born in Ireland, that story is fragmented at best.  

Since I first established this website in 2008 or thereabouts, I have heard from several people interested in Henry Elliott who have provided questions and data though few concrete answers.  I plan to share that information soon, but want to do so systematically.

One way I will attempt to do so will be in the forums section of this site, and I will soon publish a forum topic around Henry Elliott.  I hope those with additional information regarding Henry will share it on the forum.

An apparently excellent source of information on the Elliotts in Ireland and Scotland is the website http://elliotclanusa.com, including this history page: http://elliotclanusa.com/ecs_history.htm.

Mar 302012
 

Robert N. Mottice served in WWII, entering the service as Private and leaving as a Master Sergeant.  He was not shipped overseas like his brother Merle, but served in various capacities in the States including with the Military Police.  

His posts included Camp Tyson, TN, Ft. Lewis, WA, Ft. Custer MI, Camp Lordsburg NM, Ft. Clark TX, Camp Maxey, TX, Camp Gruber OK, Camp Rucker AL, Ft. Ord CA, and Ft. Riley KS.  

During these deployments he was able to keep a photo record of some of the places he saw and people he served with. This album contains over 500 photos between the years 1941 and 1945.

Mar 292012
 

James B. Mottice, son of Peter Mottice and Mary Sibert, and James W. Mottice, son of John B. Mottice and Elizabeth Cachel, have obviously similar names and were born only several years apart — James B. in 1832 and James W. in 1835.  This has caused confusion for me in going through family and historical records, and came to a head with an obituary for James "B." that instead is probably for James "W."  I am indebted for the clarification to Donna Bott, who is related, I believe to James W. through his wife Louisa Marker.

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Mar 292012
 

[Note:  This is an updated post based on information subsequently received from Donna Bott.  I am indebted to her for providing identification of James W. Mottice and for his photo.]

This tintype photo was in the possession of Robert N. Mottice, and in an envelope labeled, "Tin-type of John C. Mottice and brothers." Although the image is in rather poor condition, it is one of the oldest Mottice photos I have.

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Mar 272012
 

Robert N. Mottice, who died in 2003 at the age of 87, was the son of Grant Mottice and Frances Dieringer.  This autobiography of his is a compilation of a historical account of his childhood that he wrote while a student at Glenville State College, and personal memoirs he wrote late in life for his 4 grandsons.  It was originally recorded on audio tape in 1997.

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Mar 272012
 

This is the story of Robert Mottice, grandfather of Ryan, Bret, Kent, and Iain.  It was requested by our son Bob to do this is as a tribute to the boys and do something that would add to their recollection of their family when they grew older.  I'll start by reading an autobiography that was written by me in my senior year at Glenville State College.

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Mar 272012
 

I started high school in Waynesburg in the fall of 1930.  The Depression was in full swing now, and money was almost nonexistent.  Merle and I got a paper route with some 30 customers.  It was the Dover Times, and we made $.10 a day on the route, which was better than nothing.  The Whittaker-Greer fireproofing Company of Waynesburg turned over a large tract of land to people during the Depression for community gardens.  We had a half acre plot, which my Dad, Merle and I tended.

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Mar 272012
 

Jobs were difficult to find that summer of 1934.  I worked at the National Fireproofing Company for awhile, did some carpenter work picked some apples, husked corn and clerked at Elsass’ grocery store.  Wages were from 10 to $.40 an hour.  Of course, retail prices were correspondingly low.  My graduation suit, all wool, cost $11.90, which included a hat at no charge.

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Mar 272012
 

We were at home in Waynesburg celebrating Mom’s birthday on Dec. 7, 1941 when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor.  With our entrance in the war, draft calls were increased and I received my call to report for a physical on Jan. 19, 1942.  We were examined in Cleveland and I passed with flying colors.  One month later, I became a GI – Government Issue.  The thermometer stood at 20 below zero that morning of February 19 when I kissed Mom goodbye.  Merle and Ruth drove me to Akron where we were taken by bus to Camp Perry, OH. 

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Mar 272012
 

After a short vacation in Florida visiting some army friends, I resumed my work at McKesson & Robbins. In January 1948. I received a promotion to salesman. I liked the work pretty well but had my heart set on going to college. While visiting the campus of Glenville State College in West Virginia in 1949 I decided that this was the time and place for me to go to school.

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Mar 272012
 

Before I go into the next phase of my life, let me pull together some loose ends.

I had a very happy home life. My mother was very kind and loving, encouraging me to do well in school, which I did.  She was a hard worker. In addition to raising 8 children, cooking, baking, mending clothing, and a thousand and one other household tasks, she found time to help my father by doing house cleaning for people in and around Waynesburg to help out our family budget.

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Mar 272012
 

As I am writing and taping this autobiography for you, your father is compiling a family tree for you on his computer.  So I will not include any genealogy on these tapes since he will have it for you on the computer.  Instead I will tell you some stories about your ancestors that have been handed down over the years.  Some of them may deviate from the truth at times, but they are told to you in good faith.

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Mar 272012
 

[Note — Evidence suggests that this transcription is in error, and that it in fact refers to James W. Mottice instead.  See this discussion in the forums.]

From an unidentified, undated newspaper clipping:

"James B. Mottice –
Born at Indian Run Valley, Stark Co., Ohio, September 15, 1835, married Eliza Markel in 1857. To them were born 7 children, 5 of them and 13 grandchildren with the widow survive him.

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Mar 272012
 

From an unidentified, undated newspaper clipping:

"Miss Abigail Mottice was born October 4, 1833 in Sandy Township and died at Waynesburg, October 9, 1914; age 81 years and 5 days.

"At the age of 15 years she united with the Presbyterian Church of Waynesburg, Ohio and remained a faithful member until her death. She possessed a deep religious nature. In her lifetime she had many opportunities to put into practice the life which she professed. This she never failed to do with the tenderest devotion.

"From a family of ten, Miss Mottice was the last to survive. Her life will ever be a benediction to all who knew her. She leaves to mourn nephews and nieces and many friends. Funeral services were held at the Presbyterian Church October 11, at 2:00 o'clock."

Mar 262012
 

From an unidentified newspaper, 1999:

Ruth E. Mottice Garster, 7-6-1908 to 9-11-1999

Ruth E. Garster, 91, of Canton OH passed away Saturday morning in the Shady Lawn Nursing Home following an extended illness. Born in Canton, OH on July 6, 1908, she was the daughter of the late Grant and Frances (Dieringer) Mottice.

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Mar 262012
 

The genealogical search for the Mottice family effectively ends with Peter Mottice, 1772-1855. As I posted previously, we don't know the name of his father or any other details with any degree of certainty.

Peter Mottice, however, is a different story. We have his obituary, his will, historical records, church records, and family records that paint a fairly detailed portrait of Grant Mottice's great grandfather. He was an early pioneer in the area of Waynesburg when it was largely uninhabited and still subject to Indian attack. He was founder and elder of the Waynesburg Presbyterian Church in 1823. He was a Justice of the Peace for the county for many years, and we have his written records of at least a portion of this time.

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Mar 262012
 

John Mottice, son of Peter and Pheby Mottice, was born in 1800 and died in 1879. He was the only son of Pheby.

There is uncertainty about his middle name. Charles D. Mottice, in his genealogy of John's half brother James, identifies him as John Crawford Mottice. Charles K. Mottice, in his history of the line that runs through John's son James, identifies him as John L. Mottice. But the 1870 census report identifies him as John B. Mottice, and all other documents list his middle initial as "B".

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Mar 262012
 

Jabez Elliott and his wife Elizabeth Wigner lived in the area between what is now Clarksburg, WV and Ritchie Co., WV.  They are both buried in the Smithville Ayers Cemetery though where they were born is uncertain.  Jabez fought in the War of 1812 and several Indian wars.

Below is much of what we now about him from the original sources, both family and historical:

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Mar 262012
 

William (Will) Dieringer (1870-1940) was the brother of Frances Dieringer, wife of Grant Mottice.  His father was Andrew Dieringer and mother was Katharina Stroble.  This photo album was in the possession of my father, Robert Mottice.  I suspect it came to him by way of his sister, Ruth Mottice Garster, after Frances Dieringer Mottice passed away.

The album is in excellent shape for being somewhere in the neighborhood of 100 years old.  The photos are very high quality, most having been taken at the J.M. Jenks studio in Waynesburg, OH.  The oldest photo in this album is of William's father Andrew as a young boy.  Since Andrew was born in 1843, the photo probably dates to around 1850.

Mar 262012
 

Robert N. Mottice was the 6th child (out of eight) of Grant and Frances Mottice. He was born in 1916 at North Industry, OH, which is between Waynesburg and Canton. Apparently his middle name was originally "Neal", as this is the name that shows on some early documents though he used "Neil" as his middle name during his adult life.

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Mar 262012
 

 

Peter Mottice was the owner and operator of a tavern in the Sandy Valley during the early 19th century.  It was located on what is now Mottice Dr. just outside of Waynesburg.  The structure is gone, but I was given several photos by a woman who lived as a young girl in what was probably the old tavern.   Both photos were taken around that time and show her family in front of the house.

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Mar 262012
 

Merle Mottice received a military honor while fighting at the Battle of Guam in the Pacific theatre during WWII, according to an article in the Canton Repository sometime in 1944.

He was a leader of an ammunition and pioneer squad during that battle and received the combat infantryman badge for "outstanding performance of duty and exemplary conduct in action in the Guam operation."

Mar 252012
 

Grant Edgar Mottice was born on Dec. 6, 1865 in Waynesburg.

In his father's Bible he is referred to at two separate pages as "Edwin Grant" and "Grant Edgar".

He was the son of John C. Mottice and Catherine Gross.  He married Frances Dieringer on Dec. 28, 1903, and they had eight children.  He died unexpectedly on March 9, 1938 of a ruptured gastric ulcer.  He is buried in Waynesburg cemetery.

The photo to the right is undated, but probably before the turn of the century although it could be a wedding photo.  It is the best photo of him I know of.

Mar 252012
 

Frances Dieringer was the daughter of Andrew Dieringer and Mary Holshoy, and later wife to Grant Mottice.

She was 8th of 12 Dieringer children, ten of whom were girls. Of her 9 sisters, six were older than she. She was born in Waynesburg and lived there most of her life. In the 1950s (perhaps earlier), she moved to Canton with her daughter, Ruth, after Ruth's husband Verle Garster died.

She married Grant Mottice in 1903, and they had 8 children before he died in 1938. In the last year(s) of her life, she lived in a nursing home in Canton. This photo of her was probably taken in the late 1950s or early 1960s, and is probably at Ruth's house in Canton.

She is buried, along with Grant, at Waynesburg Cemetery.

Mar 252012
 

The Reip cemetery sits atop a wooded hill overlooking the old Reip farm near Euclid, WV. It is a small cemetery containing only 2 generations of Reips — Frank and his father Peter, and their wives.

Access to the cemetery is from the foot of the lane leading to the farm. It is on the opposite side of the lane from the farm, and you have to walk along the lane while gradually climbing uphill in order to reach the cemetery. It is surrounding by a low chain link fence and is periodically cared for by some of the local descendants. Because of its somewhat difficult access, however, I have trimmed weeds on occasions, too. The photo shown here looks across the cemetery and down over the hill toward the foot of the lane. If you could see ninety degrees to the left of the angle from which this photo was taken you could see the farm house, which is directly below the hill.

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Mar 252012
 

The old Reip farm was the home of Goldie Reip Elliott. Built, according to family recollection, by either Goldie's father Frank Reip or grandfather Peter Reip, it was in an area south of Grantsville, WV known as "up on the West Fork." The West Fork (of the Kanawha River, I believe) passes through an area in southern Calhoun County along Rt. 16.

As late as the 1950s and 1960s it had the reputation of being a wild area with one section known as Bear Fork because black bear were common there. As a kid at this time, I can remember begging my family to take us up there when we visited the Elliotts and see the bears. We never did.

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Mar 242012
 

Maxine Elliott Mottice was the second child and oldest daughter of Bernard and Goldie Elliott. She was born in Grantsville, WV in 1928 and lived there with her family on the south side on the hill overlooking the Little Kanawha River.

She and her family spent many happy times visiting Elliott relatives up at Sycamore and Reip relatives up on the West Fork.  When her mother died — when Maxine was 10 years old — these trips became a welcome respite to an increasingly difficult life.

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Mar 242012
 

Goldie (or Golda, as it sometimes appears) Reip was the wife of Bernard Elliott. She died in childbirth on Dec. 16, 1938 at the age of 33 with her unborn son, Lewis. She and Bernard had four previous children: John Francis, Maxine, Pauline, and Nina Rose.

She was the daughter of Frank Reip and Victoria Mace. She was born in Calhoun County near the village of Orma on the West Fork. She grew up there at the Reip family home built by Frank Reip, just down over the hill from the Reip family cemetery.

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Mar 242012
 

Peter Mottice was a founding elder of the Presbyterian Church in Waynesburg, Oh. The congregation was formed in 1821, and many of the old church records, or session records, still exist. Some of these make reference to Peter and his family, along with his descendants who were church members. In 2009 I was able to make scanned copies  of all these session records that, at least at the time, were the only electronic copies of these fragile records.

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Mar 242012
 

In addition to being County Commissioner and ruling elder of the Presbyterian Church, Peter Mottice also served as Justice of the Peace in Stark County for a number of years. 

This log book records his activities as he discharged his duties as JP. Although we are missing a number of pages — the first page is numbered "82" — many pages remain.

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Mar 232012
 

Three years prior to his death in 1855, Peter Mottice made the will that is shown here. There is no indication that he was in declining health, though he was attaining a ripe old age.

This copy of his will is from the Genealogical Archives of the Stark County (OH) Public Library. The original is gone, but this copy on microfiche (along with his other estate documents) was made from the original. It was evidently common practice to not keep original probate material once it was recorded on microfiche or microfilm.

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Mar 232012
 

Peter Mottice purchased two plots of land in Stark County — one described as in Osnaburg in 1806 and another described as in Sandy in 1812. One of these — presumably the latter — became the homestead where several generations of Mottices were born. Access was probably via the road now know as "Mottice Dr." just north of Waynesburg and west of Rt. 43.

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Mar 232012
 

The original copy of this document is on microfiche in the Stark County Library in Canton, OH.  This is one of the most puzzling documents in the Mottice family history.  Naturalization papers exist to confer nationality upon a person.  This one clearly states that Peter Mottice was being awarded status as a U.S. citizen in 1847, and that he previously was a citizen of France (King Louis Phiilippe was monarch in 1847).  Yet all family accounts have Peter born in the U.S.  The reference to him as Peter Mottice Senior was common to distinguish him from his nephew of the same name.

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Mar 232012
 

In a collection of historical records entitled, "Gateway to the West, Volume II," the section on Stark Co., Will Abstracts, 1811-1822, page 555 mentions Peter Mottice as an executor of the will of John Hewitt, whose brother James was evidently the first justice of the peace in the area and immediately preceded Peter Mottice in that office:

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Mar 232012
 

Peter Mottice, in addition to being on of the "old pioneers" in Stark County, was one of the first to serve as Justice of the Peace in this area.  Much of this job apparently required the adjudication of disputes, as his case log attests.  This case log in which he recorded the facts and findings of his job  is one of the most interesting documents about the Mottices still in existence.

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Mar 232012
 

Mary Holshoy was born and baptised in 1844.  The writing on this certificate is old and faded, written in German, and very hard to read.  The date, however, is clearly indicated as 1844, and that the event occurred in Ohio. The first attached image is a photo of the entire certificate. The second is an enlarged scan of only the personal information that has been filled in on the certificate.

Mary was later confirmed in 1862.  This certificate of confirmation is also written in German, though recorded in Ohio. The name of the county is illegible (probably Tuscarawas) as is the month in which the confirmation took place. Her name as spelled on the document is Maria Holshoi.

Mar 222012
 

John C. Mottice served with the 162 Regiment of the Ohio Volunteers during the Civil War. In his service time the 162nd Regiment was deployed at "Valley of the Shenandoah, on the Peninsula, in the Operations of the James River, around Petersburg and Richmond, in the Battle of Monocacy, and in the Intrenchments of Washington." The two documents in this collection are his original discharge and a certificate of recognition for service.

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Mar 222012
 

Calvin Mottice died in 1857 at the age if 18. He was the son of John B. Mottice and Elizabeth Cachel.

This notebook of his, which I call a "sketch book", appears to be a collection of handwriting practice exercises and a few other curious revelations of his thoughts. The date of 1857 appears on some pages, so this was evidently written during the last year of his life.  There is no indication in any family records why he died young or why this sketch book was kept by the family. I have not looked carefully at every page, so there may be some new information contained here.

Mar 222012
 

Robert N. Mottice graduated from Glenville State College (WV) in 1952.  He began his college studies on the GI Bill after he was discharged from the Army at the end of WWII. 

He thoroughly enjoyed his four years there, and made many lifelong friends. While at Glenville, he majored in education and earned a number of honors, including the ones shown here. It was at Glenville that he met Maxine Elliott. Although she was younger than he was, she was a year ahead of him at college and graduated from Glenville in 1951. They married after he graduated in 1952.

Mar 222012
 

Here is a baptismal document of some sort, dated November 17, 1872 and written in German that I cannot translate because of the elaborate script.

It refers to "the two spouses" Andreas [Andrew] Dieringer and his "fine wife" who was born "Maria Holzhey", then in large letters "_urde geboren" followed by the date in 1872 and the location in Waynesburg, OH. "Geboren" means "born" in German, but the first letter of "_urde" I cannot decipher and cannot translate.

 

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Mar 222012
 

This announcement appeared in the Ohio Repository on December 5, 1816.  This is the only known reference to Margaret, daughter of Peter, although I recently found a reference to "Margaret Creighton wife of John Creighton" in the session record for May 25, 1823 in the Waynesburg Presbyterian Church records.  Her husband, John Creighton, has the same surname of a good friend of Peter's and is therefore likely to be his son.

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Mar 222012
 

Millie Elliott, 1891-1976, was the sister of Bernard Elliott and daughter of John A. and Arminda Elliott.

This handwritten genealogy, in the possession of Eula Elliott, Millie's niece, is one of the only surviving examples of her handwriting that I am aware of.  In it she documents her father's and mother's immediate families.  This includes John A.'s brothers and sisters and his mother and father, as well as Arminda's brothers and sisters and her parents.

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Mar 222012
 

This letter is to Mrs. J.A. Elliott (Arminda Hathaway, "Aunt Arminda") from Mrs. Hattie Nelson, dated Sept. 16, 1926. It is a curious letter, not because of the content but because it still exists.

In the letter, Mrs. Nelson addresses Mrs Elliott as "aunt" and informs her of the recent death of Mrs. Nelson's mother. She also asks Mrs. Elliott if she would notify "Uncle Frank" and "Aunt Duck."

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Mar 212012
 

Jabez Elliott married Elizabeth Wigner on Dec. 9 1807 in Harrison Co., Virginia. This area is now part of West Virginia, and is the county in which Clarksburg is located. The marriage bond was executed on Dec. 5, and indicates that Elizabeth's father was Daniel Wigner. The two documents are from the archives of the West Virginia Division of Culture and History, Vital Research Records. Partial transcript (with adjustment to modern English) of the marriage bond is as follows:

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Mar 212012
 

This is Bernard Elliott's small, pocket notebook — approx. 3.5" wide and 6" tall — previously in the possession of Maxine (Elliott) Mottice. The dates of the entries range from 1909 to 1924, two years prior to his marriage.

Most of the notes in this book are school facts, that is, things that a young student would be expected to know about politics, geography, grammar, etc. Since Bernard taught 2nd grade sometime around 1915 it is easy to assume that these notes had something to do with his teaching position.

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Mar 212012
 

Bernard Elliott taught the second grade in the Lee District of Calhoun County public schools during 1915.  
 
This is the certificate issued by the West Virginia Dept. of Free Schools certifying his authority to teach.  His combined score for all subjects in which he had to display competency was over 88 (%, presumably).  His weakest subject was "Theory and Art of Teaching" (76%) while his strongest was "Arithmetic" (100%).  This probably goes a long way in explaining why he switched to banking as a vocation.
Mar 212012
 

Charles D. Mottice produced this family tree of the descendants of James B. Mottice, who was a son and only child of Peter Mottice and his 2nd wife Mary Sibert.  Charles was a great-grandson of John B. through his father Charles E. Mottice and grandfather Charles B. Mottice.

In this genealogy, Jean-Marie Motice is identified as the father of Peter Mottice. Two of Peter's daughters, Margaret and Mahala, are also missing from the list of his children. There are a few other inconsistencies with other genealogies as well, but this is some of the best information I have about the James B.Mottice line.

Mar 212012
 

Much of what I know of the Diering family comes from a pamphlet entitled "Brief Historical Sketch of the Dieringer Family" by John Wiest and H.J. Dieringer. It traces the family back to a location in what is now the area of Baden-Württemberg in Germany. The date of this writing is uncertain. It mentions a church register there from the sixteenth century, but the first names in this pamphlet are from the 18th century.   Frances Dieringer was the daughter of Andrew Dieringer, the great-great-grandson of Christoph Dieringer identified in this pamphlet, whose contents appear below:

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Mar 212012
 

 

In 1981, the Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society responded to a request by Bob Mottice for information on early Mottices in Pennsylvania.  Subsequent research by him and others has failed to convincingly associate any of these names with Mottice ancestors.  The LMHS researcher was looking for Peter, but we subsequently know that Peter went from Morris County, NJ to the area around Washington, PA as a member of the militia during the Whiskey Rebellion. So it is unlikely that any of the Peters she found were our Peter Mottice.

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Mar 212012
 

I have heard the name of Jean-Marie Motice as an ancestor for many years, but have never been able to pin down who he is. I had thought he might be the father of Peter, but there is evidence that Jean-Marie was alive in 1783 which conflicts with other informal family histories about Peter's father.

But I have recently uncovered a letter sent to my father from Lynn G. Mottice of Mentor, OH in 1982 that fills in some blanks. Here are relevant excerpts from that letter:

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Mar 212012
 

The elusive father of Peter Mottice is thought by Charles D. Mottice to be James Thomas. In a letter to Bob Mottice on Aug. 31, 1994, Charles D. says:

"There are records that do indicate Peter's father was named James Thomas Mottice. He was born in Mons, France. He was at an early age forced out of France by the Catholic faith and so all Protestants left France and went to Germany or as close to Germany as they could get. From there [Peter’s] father came to the colonies. As you know, his father went into the colonial army under George Washington."

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Mar 212012
 

This is a transcript of a letter written by John Creighton Mottice, son of James B. Mottice.

[Ed. note — this is not John Creighton Mottice, son of John B. Mottice.  This is where the lineage gets confusing.  Both John Creighton Mottices are sons of half-brothers John B. and James B, whose father was Peter Mottice.  James B.'s son was born in 1860 while John B.'s son was born in 1838.]

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Mar 202012
 

This historical account of the Mottice family from 1942 comes from Garnett Mottice, who was a descendant of John B. Mottice through his son James W. Mottice.  Garnett's parents were Oliver James Mottice (b. 1886) and Hazel Heckaman (b. 1889); Oliver's parents were William Mottice (b. 1862) and Sarah Caroline Farber; William's parents were James W. Mottice (1835-1899) and Louisa Marker (1835-1900); James W. Mottice was a son of John B. Mottice and a brother of John C. Mottice.  The copy of this account comes from Dorothy Farber, a relative of Garnett Mottice. This account's version of Peter Mottice's origins differes significantly from what appear to be this historical record, at least based on Peter Mottice's obituary.

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