Aug 282015
 

One of the very pleasant as well as interesting aspects of exploring family history is encountering distant relatives, and relatives of related families.  They invariably have useful information to share, but beyond that is the enjoyment of simply engaging with them on these matters of shared interest.

Such has been the case for me with a descendant of one of the families that intermingled with the Mottice family during the early days of Stark County.  George Farris is a descendant of John and Margaret Creighton; Margaret’s father and mother were Peter and Pheby Mottice. Continue reading »

Mar 292012
 
4 brothers

John C. Mottice and brothers

[Note:  This is an updated post based on information subsequently received from Donna Bott.  I am indebted to her for providing identification of James W. Mottice and for his photo.]

This tintype photo was in the possession of Robert N. Mottice, and in an envelope labeled, “Tin-type of John C. Mottice and brothers.” Although the image is in rather poor condition, it is one of the oldest Mottice photos I have.

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Mar 262012
 

William (Will) Dieringer (1870-1940) was the brother of Frances Dieringer, wife of Grant Mottice.  His father was Andrew Dieringer and mother was Katharina Stroble.  This photo album was in the possession of my father, Robert Mottice.  I suspect it came to him by way of his sister, Ruth Mottice Garster, after Frances Dieringer Mottice passed away.

The album is in excellent shape for being somewhere in the neighborhood of 100 years old.  The photos are very high quality, most having been taken at the J.M. Jenks studio in Waynesburg, OH.  The oldest photo in this album is of William's father Andrew as a young boy.  Since Andrew was born in 1843, the photo probably dates to around 1850.

Mar 262012
 

mottice_road_tavern_1Peter Mottice was the owner and operator of a tavern in the Sandy Valley during the early 19th century.  It was located on what is now Mottice Dr. just outside of Waynesburg.  The structure is gone, but I was given several photos by a woman who lived as a young girl in what was probably the old tavern.   Both photos were taken around that time and show her family in front of the house.

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Mar 252012
 

The Reip cemetery sits atop a wooded hill overlooking the old Reip farm near Euclid, WV. It is a small cemetery containing only 2 generations of Reips — Frank and his father Peter, and their wives.

Access to the cemetery is from the foot of the lane leading to the farm. It is on the opposite side of the lane from the farm, and you have to walk along the lane while gradually climbing uphill in order to reach the cemetery. It is surrounding by a low chain link fence and is periodically cared for by some of the local descendants. Because of its somewhat difficult access, however, I have trimmed weeds on occasions, too. The photo shown here looks across the cemetery and down over the hill toward the foot of the lane. If you could see ninety degrees to the left of the angle from which this photo was taken you could see the farm house, which is directly below the hill.

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Mar 252012
 

The old Reip farm was the home of Goldie Reip Elliott. Built, according to family recollection, by either Goldie's father Frank Reip or grandfather Peter Reip, it was in an area south of Grantsville, WV known as "up on the West Fork." The West Fork (of the Kanawha River, I believe) passes through an area in southern Calhoun County along Rt. 16.

As late as the 1950s and 1960s it had the reputation of being a wild area with one section known as Bear Fork because black bear were common there. As a kid at this time, I can remember begging my family to take us up there when we visited the Elliotts and see the bears. We never did.

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Mar 242012
 

In addition to being County Commissioner and ruling elder of the Presbyterian Church, Peter Mottice also served as Justice of the Peace in Stark County for a number of years. 

This log book records his activities as he discharged his duties as JP. Although we are missing a number of pages — the first page is numbered "82" — many pages remain.

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Mar 232012
 

Peter Mottice, in addition to being on of the "old pioneers" in Stark County, was one of the first to serve as Justice of the Peace in this area.  Much of this job apparently required the adjudication of disputes, as his case log attests.  This case log in which he recorded the facts and findings of his job  is one of the most interesting documents about the Mottices still in existence.

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Mar 222012
 

Calvin Mottice died in 1857 at the age if 18. He was the son of John B. Mottice and Elizabeth Cachel.

This notebook of his, which I call a "sketch book", appears to be a collection of handwriting practice exercises and a few other curious revelations of his thoughts. The date of 1857 appears on some pages, so this was evidently written during the last year of his life.  There is no indication in any family records why he died young or why this sketch book was kept by the family. I have not looked carefully at every page, so there may be some new information contained here.

Mar 222012
 

Robert N. Mottice graduated from Glenville State College (WV) in 1952.  He began his college studies on the GI Bill after he was discharged from the Army at the end of WWII. 

He thoroughly enjoyed his four years there, and made many lifelong friends. While at Glenville, he majored in education and earned a number of honors, including the ones shown here. It was at Glenville that he met Maxine Elliott. Although she was younger than he was, she was a year ahead of him at college and graduated from Glenville in 1951. They married after he graduated in 1952.

Mar 222012
 

Millie Elliott, 1891-1976, was the sister of Bernard Elliott and daughter of John A. and Arminda Elliott.

This handwritten genealogy, in the possession of Eula Elliott, Millie's niece, is one of the only surviving examples of her handwriting that I am aware of.  In it she documents her father's and mother's immediate families.  This includes John A.'s brothers and sisters and his mother and father, as well as Arminda's brothers and sisters and her parents.

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Mar 222012
 

This letter is to Mrs. J.A. Elliott (Arminda Hathaway, "Aunt Arminda") from Mrs. Hattie Nelson, dated Sept. 16, 1926. It is a curious letter, not because of the content but because it still exists.

In the letter, Mrs. Nelson addresses Mrs Elliott as "aunt" and informs her of the recent death of Mrs. Nelson's mother. She also asks Mrs. Elliott if she would notify "Uncle Frank" and "Aunt Duck."

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Mar 212012
 

This is Bernard Elliott's small, pocket notebook — approx. 3.5" wide and 6" tall — previously in the possession of Maxine (Elliott) Mottice. The dates of the entries range from 1909 to 1924, two years prior to his marriage.

Most of the notes in this book are school facts, that is, things that a young student would be expected to know about politics, geography, grammar, etc. Since Bernard taught 2nd grade sometime around 1915 it is easy to assume that these notes had something to do with his teaching position.

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Mar 212012
 

Bernard Elliott taught the second grade in the Lee District of Calhoun County public schools during 1915.  
 
This is the certificate issued by the West Virginia Dept. of Free Schools certifying his authority to teach.  His combined score for all subjects in which he had to display competency was over 88 (%, presumably).  His weakest subject was "Theory and Art of Teaching" (76%) while his strongest was "Arithmetic" (100%).  This probably goes a long way in explaining why he switched to banking as a vocation.
Feb 292012
 

 

The only Mottice Family Bible I know to be currently in existence is one originally owned by John Mottice and Catharine Gross, so it probably dates from around 1860.  It was in the possession of Robert N. Mottice (John's grandson), and before that, of his son Grant Mottice and his wife, Frances Dieringer.

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Feb 292012
 

 

Here are images of 4 hunting licenses held by Grant Mottice for the years 1928-1931.

These documents are significant because they provide information about him that is not available from other sources. They each list his occupation as "Painter." He is described on them as being 5'10" tall and weighing 165 lbs. His eyes were brown, and his hair was brownish-grey.

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